#28 Watch 4 classic films

I grew up in a family of movie watchers. Sitting down to watch a film together in my household was much like sitting down as a family to eat dinner. It was a very regular occurrence and yet another manifestation of that all important quality time. In my very young years (pre-arrival of Khorie), I watched Charlotte’s Web so many times that my parents got wise and just bought the movie for me. One of my early memories of the film screening experience was when I was 5 years old. My Uncle Manny took both my cousin and I to see Benji at Garden City Cinema (which is now closed after 40 years). That film left such a mark that I came home to my mom and dad desperately wanting a doggie. (Not very long after that – Precious joined our family.) After our family grew to include another little person, we acquired a wonderful collection of Disney films and spent many weekends watching them. And those movie theatre experiences continued. Each little person who joined my extended family got added to the crew. For 13 years we kept this tradition. The last film we all watched together in theatre was Stuart Little over the holidays in 1999/2000. And by then, I was no longer a kid so I had the privilege of joining my Uncle in the ranks of “adult” – ushering the little kids back and forth from the washroom during the 84 minute film. (It was then that I learned how tiny kids’ bladders actually are.)

So now that I have established how much of a film buff I am, I should explain where the classic films fit into this. With the many summer days I spent at my Grandma’s house as a kid, I got to learn a bit about classic films. My Uncle had a fascination with classic films and every year my mom would buy him a coffee table book on one or more Old Hollywood films. Sometime after my brother was born, I recall an addition to my uncle’s book collection that was called –  Hollywood Classics: The Maltese Falcon. Fascinating stuff. I had no idea what it was all about but I was certain I wanted to see it.

As you might expect, each of us as a family has our own special interest in film according to era or genre or star. For example, my parents have probably seen every movie that featured Elvis Presley (between 1956 and 1969). And in my brother’s teen years, he developed a real taste for the greatest star of slapstick comedy – Jerry Lewis. But for me, I love the classics (which I define as Old Hollywood films pre-1970s whether they were acclaimed or not).

So here’s most  of what I have seen pre-Thirty by 30 list that I consider to be more obscure than White Christmas and It’s a Wonderful Life which air on TV every year.

  • 12 Angry Men (1957)
  • Adam’s Rib (1949)
  • The African Queen (1951)
  • All About Eve (1950)
  • All Quiet on the Western Front (1930)
  • Arsenic & Old Lace (1944)
  • Breakfast at Tiffany (1961)
  • Bringing Up Baby (1938)
  • Casablanca (1942)
  • Cat on a Hot Tin Roof (1958)
  • Charade (1963)
  • Cool Hand Luke (1967)
  • Father of the Bride (1950)
  • Gone With the Wind (1939)
  • Guess Who’s Coming to Dinner (1967)
  • How to Marry a Millionaire (1953)
  • Lion in the Winter (1968)
  • The Philadelphia Story (1940)
  • Roman Holiday (1953)
  • Sabrina (1954)
  • The Shop Around the Corner (1940)
  • Rebel Without a Cause (1955)
  • A Streetcar Named Desire (1951)
  • Vertigo (1958)
  • West Side Story (1961)
  • The Women (1939)

Now here are the four that I picked up for my Thirty by 30 adventure listed in the order they were watched.

Favourite film: From Here to Eternity. Favourite leading lady: Irene Dunne. Favourite leading man: Montgomery Clift.

And #28 is done!

Advertisements

Leave a Comment

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s